By Jon

Malcolm Gladwell has written an article about why otherwise sensible business people buy sports teams, and what they get out of it.

Almost in passing, he makes the following remarks:

The best illustration of psychic benefits is the art market. Art collectors buy paintings for two reasons. They are interested in the painting as an investment — the same way they would view buying stock in General Motors. And they are interested in the painting as a painting — as a beautiful object. In a recent paper in Economics Bulletin, the economists Erdal Atukeren and Aylin Seçkin used a variety of clever ways to figure out just how large the second psychic benefit is, and they put it at 28 percent.7 In other words, if you pay $100 million for a Van Gogh, $28 million of that is for the joy of looking at it every morning. If that seems like a lot, it shouldn’t. There aren’t many Van Goghs out there, and they are very beautiful. If you care passionately about art, paying that kind of premium makes perfect sense.

The paper is available here and is interesting throughout.

It reminds me of Bruce Hood’s SuperSense and (the accompanying blog) in which he has written about the physiological and psychological reasons why people come to believe objects have non-physical properties. As a result, the object’s value is often significantly enhanced.

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